New Parrot Toys Every Month

April 11th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

By now you know the importance of toys for your parrot…or at least you should! Since most parrots have the mental capacity of an inquisitive toddler, it is very important to their overall wellbeing to have adequate toys to play with. Not only do such toys provide your parrot with mental stimulation, but they can even help you to teach your parrot skills such as foraging.

But it can be quite difficult when it comes to choosing the right type of toy for your parrot. Just as there are many different varieties of pet birds and parrots, there are also just as many varieties of toys for parrots.

Keep in mind that parrots need a minimum of five toys in their cage, and each toy should be of a different texture, color and used for a different type of playing and learning. When choosing a toy for your parrot, you can’t go wrong with choosing a foraging toy. Wild parrots have to forage for their food and such a foraging toy in your parrot’s cage can help them keep their mind stimulated and their beaks busy. You can place your parrot’s favorite treats inside a foraging toy and allow him or her to have fun trying to figure out how to get to their treats.

Another favorite toy to get, especially if you have a very smart parrot, is a puzzle toy. Such a toy can keep your parrot occupied happily for hours on end! Smart parrots love a challenge and puzzle toys are just perfect.

If you have a parrot that loves to chew things up and destroy everything you put on, in or near their cage, then the best type of toy to get them is one that is made hardily and that will stand up to even the strongest beak.

Toys for parrots provide a better alternative than to have your parrot chew up your furniture or curtains. Parrot toys also give your parrot safe items to investigate instead of exploring dangerous household items, such as cleaners. Remember to always praise your parrot whenever you see him or her playing with their toys, as this will reiterate to them that playing with their toys is a good thing.

However, you must take care when choosing toys for your parrot. Some parrot toy manufacturers are unscrupulous and create toys that can be downright harmful to your parrot. There are some toys that are available to purchase right now on the shelf at your local pet store that contains Zinc, Lead and made with harmful, toxic wood. You’ll have to be very careful in your parrot toy selection to insure the health and safety of your parrot.

New Parrot Toys Every Month


Bird Toys are One of the Best Ways to Stimulate Your Bird’s Mind

Check Out The Awesome Collection Of Parrot Toys Now

We all know how intelligent our pet birds are, so imagine how boring their day can be when they are left all alone while you are at work. Wild parrots are used to flying over 50 miles in just a single day to forage for food! This means that a pet bird has to have other ways to stimulate his mind and keep him busy.

Click here to see how easy it is to keep your bird happy

Toys Prevent Bad Behaviors

When a bird gets bored, oftentimes problem behaviors develop. You might see things like:

Screaming

Biting

Plucking Feathers

Rotating new toys every month means that your bird never tires of the toys and remains mentally and physically stimulated.

Click here to see safe and fun parrot toys

Where Can You Buy SAFE Toys?

Safety has to come first. Many commercial parrot toys are flimsily made, and your bird may be exposed to zinc, lead, formaldehyde, or stained woods. All of these items can be toxic to your bird and can lead to life threatening issues!

Parrot Toys by Mail has toys that are 100% double-checked for safety and include only natural, non-toxic items like:

Bamboo

Cuttle bone

Coconut shell

Corn cobs

Oyster shells

When you join Parrot Toys by Mail, you’ll receive 3 size appropriate toys for your bird to enjoy each month. Plus there is a Rewards program where you can earn FREE toys, and there is no long-term commitment!

Click to learn more about Parrot Toys by Mail and
see actual examples of the toys

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Caring For Your Pet Bird

March 23rd, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Caring for the health of your beloved pet parrot is most probably your number one concern, regardless of whether your parrot has just been weaned or if your parrot is an older bird that you have just adopted. Your parrot’s overall wellbeing is very important as a parrot that is well cared for will live a very happy and healthy life for many years to come.

The first thing to consider when trying to put your parrot on the right path to good health, is to make sure that they are eating right. A good diet makes a good parrot!

Parrots should eat plenty of fresh fruit and veggies daily. But they should also be allowed to experienced human food such as cooked pasta. Make sure to remove any leftover fruits, veggies or cooked foods when your parrot is done eating them as they might spoil and will make your parrot very sick if she eats them.

Supplement your parrot’s diet with good pellet mix. Try to choose one that does not contain Ethoxyquin, a preservative found in most pellet mixes. This preservative has been the cause of many parrot deaths over the years. Also, choose a pellet mix that does not contain too many colored pellets. While your parrot will certainly enjoy the bright colors offered to her, these colored pellets are actually made with colored sugar to give them their vibrant hues. Too much sugar is actually quite bad for a parrot’s health and wellbeing. A proper parrot diet should include a mix of pellets, seeds, nuts, fruits, vegetables and grains.

Avoid foods that are salty, fatty, contain caffeine, contain alcohol, or consist of chocolate, avocados, apple seeds or rhubarb leaves as these are all very toxic to parrots. Each type of parrot species has a unique dietary requirement. It would be in your parrot’s best interest for you to research what your parrot would eat in the wild and try to mimic that at home.

Of course, you should also make sure that your parrot has clean, fresh water available to her all the time, even if this means that you have to replace your parrot’s water three or four times a day. This is because there is a lot of bacteria that can grow quickly within dirty water that can make parrots very sick very quickly.

At least once per year, you should take your parrot into see a certified avian veterinarian for a checkup. This checkup is commonly referred to as a Well Bird Exam and should ideally be completed at least once every 6 months. The vet you see must be certified to treat birds, regular vets lack the special advanced training necessary to detect illness and injury in a pet parrot.

Always watch your parrot carefully and bring your parrot into the vet as soon as you notice any change in their behavior. Parrots will hide any injury or illness until it is almost too late to help them. So it is up to you be very vigilant to ensure your parrot’s wellbeing.

Caring For Your Pet Bird

Do
You Know How to Keep Your Bird Healthy and Safe?

Click here to read what you should be feeding
your bird for optimal health

With dogs and cats being the most common pets in homes, the information on how to properly care for pet birds is not near as great. Many owners learn their skills through trial and error, which sometimes results in sick, dead, or ill behaved birds.

With this in mind, a leading avian veterinarian stepped up to write a guide for all bird owners, new or advanced. Dr. Joel Murphy has created a book that is a must have for all bird owners!

Click here to learn just who Dr. Murphy is

What Can You Learn that You Didn’t Know?

It might surprise you to know how much there is to know about bird care! Many mistakes can easily be avoided and your bird can have a long and healthy life. Inside Dr. Murphy’s How to Care for Your Pet Bird you’ll find valuable chapters of information on subjects like:

Pet bird nutrition: Easy approach to correct nutrition. Did you know the #1 cause of illness is malnutrition?

Pet bird misconceptions: What are those myths and misconceptions about birds that might be a problem? Learn the truth!

Veterinarian: You need one for your bird too, and it’s not that easy to find one. Learn what a good bird doctor looks like and how to find that person.

Bird care: How to housetrain your bird and properly care for him to keep him healthy.

Bird illness: Learn what early symptoms look like and when you need to go to the veterinarian.

Emergencies: When is it an illness and when is it an emergency situation? Learn to spot the difference and know what is an emergency for your bird.

Beak issues: Learn more about your bird’s beak and what disorders he could suffer from.

Feather plucking: Why does he do it and how to help stop it?

Infectious diseases, fungal problems, and viruses from minor to severe.

Parasites and how to deal with them if they occur

Baby birds: Caring for baby birds and how to detect any disorders.

Aviary management: Basic and advanced information for optimum bird care.

Click here to see the table of contents for a look inside the book

Experts Agree…

The experts agree that Dr. Murphy’s How to Care for Your Pet Bird is a valuable book for anyone:

“Dr. Murphy has produced a very useful book, written in an easy-to-understand style. This text should prove an invaluable resource for pet bird owners and aviculturists alike.” Phillip Samuelson, Technical Editor, Bird Talk and Bird Breeder

“How To Care for Your Pet Bird is the consultation you always wished you could have with an avian veterinarian. A “must have” reference for every birdkeeper!” Susan Chamberlain, Contributing Editor, Bird Talk

Click to read what other experts think

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

To Bird School We Go!

February 21st, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Contrary to popular belief, every parrot can be trained to not only act on command, but to also talk, whistle and sing on command as well. Some parrots can even be trained to roller-skate or to play table-top basketball.

However, this all starts with basic parrot training. Knowing the best way to train your parrot can lead to a happy, well-socialized, and well-trained parrot.

Training your parrot will take plenty of patience and time. Because of this it is very important to know that how you interact with your parrot will have a direct effect on their training and future attitude. Therefore, it is best to always remain positive and upbeat, regardless of how frustrated you might be. And never, ever, yell or throw things at your parrot. Under no circumstances should you smack your parrot either! These can all lead to emotional and physical harm, and borders on animal abuse.

Keep the training sessions always short, sweet and to the point. This will help keep things interesting and fun for both of you and will avoid any boredom ruts.

Another thing not to do is to withhold your parrot’s food, either as punishment or for training. Instead, use their food, or favorite treat, as a training aid - a reward for learning a new word, a new command or even for just attempting a new trick.

After your training session is done, let your parrot go back into their cage so that he or she can rest for a little while and have something to eat and drink. You should wait between 30 minutes to an hour before bringing him or her out of their cage to start another training session. Keep these training session to 2 - 3 per day. More than that and your parrot will start to feel stressed out.

When training your parrot, remember to play with your parrot as well. All work and no play, will make your parrot resent their training. For every training session you do together, make sure you have a play session as well.

To Bird School We Go!

What Are You Doing in 2012?

Click here to see easy ways to train your parrot

Do you have a New Year’s resolution yet? Maybe you’re thinking about the classic ones we all hear about: eat better, lose weight, and exercise more. I’ve got a better resolution idea for you: develop a better relationship with your bird!

Click here to learn more about changing your relationship with your bird

A New Bird Outlook

Although your bird can’t have a resolution, you and he can work on this one together for a better 2012. Even if you don’t think there is a single thing wrong with your bird, wouldn’t you like to learn new training skills and techniques that you can use to teach your bird new tricks?

Learning how to train your bird in a positive and consistent manner will allow you to teach your bird all kinds of neat tricks. It will also help you work with your bird to change your relationship and make a better one….that means you can change any bad behaviors like screaming at you, biting you, or plucking out his feathers.

Click here to see how training can help your bird

See How to Do It

Take a look at videos that show you firsthand how to train your bird. Sometimes it’s easier to see exactly how to do it rather than read about it. Now you can have access to free videos that show you how to problem solve to change your bird’s behavior and also teach him new things too!

Click here to begin watching free bird videos

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

The Key to a Healthy, Happy Bird

February 7th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

After cats and dogs, parrots have become increasingly popular as a family pet. Raising a parrot to be healthy and happy can be a challenge. Here are five tips on how to raise a happy and healthy parrot:

  1. Make sure you do your homework! Research all the different parrot species to find one that is a near-perfect match to your lifestyle. Some parrots are okay spending hours alone all day in their cage with only minimal interaction when you come home from work. While others have to be out of their cages most of the time. Some parrots are known to have very high shrill vocals, and others will hardly make a peep. Doing your research beforehand can help set the foundation for a happy and health parrot in the future.
  2. Visit the Breeder! It is always best to purchase a baby parrot from a reputable breeder instead of a pet shop. This is because in a pet shop your new parrot may have been exposed to various types of airborne diseases and possibly even abuse by untrained staff. Ask the breeder if you can visit their nursery. Due to certain airborne avian diseases, the breeder may not allow you access into their nursery but they will allow you to visit their home and meet their breeder parrots. This will give you an idea of how well cared for the baby parrots are.
  3. Choose wisely! Once you have selected the right species and the right breeder you will then have to choose the right parrot. Avoid a parrot that has signs of malnutrition or physical abuse. Malnourished parrots will look like they have very breastbones when in actuality it is their overall muscle mass that has decreased. Your parrots feathers should be soft and shiny with no signs of plucking. Their eyes should also be clear, with no discharge. There should also be no discharge from their nostrils.
  4. Socialize! A great tip to raise a healthy parrot is to ensure proper socialization from the get-go. Parrots are very sociable creatures and enjoy the company of their flock members. Allow your parrot to interact with all members of your family as well as guests.
  5. Training! To ensure that you parrot is a well-adjusted member of your family, you will need to train them. Every day spend some time training your parrot with commands such as ’step-up’, ’step-down’, as well as teaching them new words and phrases.

The Key to a Healthy, Happy Bird

A Happy Healthy Bird

Click here to learn how to raise a healthy, happy and thriving parrot

Parrots can live an exceptionally long time, sometimes even outliving their owners but only if you know how to care for them. Some parrots only live a few mere years because of sickness, poor diet, or lack of care.

Click here to see what can shorten your parrot’s lifespan

The good news is that it is easy to care for a parrot and provide him both a physically and mentally healthy environment.

What are the Keys to Health?

There are three main key components for your bird’s health:

Proper cage setup

Maintenance of cage quality

Proper feeding and nutrition

If you know exactly what to do in each of these areas, you can have an extremely healthy bird.

You can learn all about these areas from Raising Polly: How-to
Raise a Healthy, Happy, Well Adjusted Bird
. This e-book is written
by a 25 year parrot lover and breeder who has learned the ins, outs, and secrets
of how to raise a healthy parrot. In this e-book, he shares these secrets with
you.

See what’s inside Raising Polly

Peek Inside

A quick peek of what’s inside this book tells you how much you can learn, whether you’re a novice bird owner or an experienced handler. You’ll learn valuable information like:

How to choose a healthy parrot

What are the signs of a sick bird or illness

Where should you place your bird’s cage

How to create your own parrot first aid kit

What to feed your bird

What does it mean when your bird does this (or that or any behavior!)

Why does your parrot pluck his feathers or squawk at you

When is the best time to try and train your bird

There is so much more as well! Plus, for a limited time, you can also get an audio book recording of Raising Polly plus you can receive a second bonus e-book: Training Your Parrot: 12 Simple Tricks Any Parrot Can Learn.

Click here to learn about the full satisfaction guarantee

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Quick and Easy Bird Training Tips

January 25th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Quick and Easy Bird Training Tips

It’s all about a pattern

Click here to see how easy it really is to have a
happy, healthy and obedient parrot

Have you ever wondered why your bird behaves the way he does? There are a few common reasons that are at the core of all of his behaviors, but the first one is that he learns about his world in patterns. It’s pretty simple, really. He learns that certain behaviors are rewarded in a positive way so he wants to continue doing them, and he learns that other behaviors are punished (have bad consequences) and he tries not to do those again.

In training your parrot you always want to encourage him to repeat behaviors with positive interactions and rewards. Anything your bird views as scary, painful, or otherwise punishing he will come to fear and avoid. You don’t want your bird to avoid you out of fear, so always make sure your interactions are positive and enjoyable for both of you.

Learn more about behavioral basics of parrotst

Instincts can rule the day

One of the other primary reasons he does what he does is out of instinct. Birds come hardwired to have certain instinctual behaviors about them, and instincts are pretty darn hard to unwire. For example, it’s common and normal for your parrot to be fairly vocal and use his voice to communicate with you. You can’t have a silent parrot, but you can work on not doing things that encourage the bad and loud screaming. Training will always be about bringing out your best bird, and that means making it match with what comes naturally to your bird. Luckily, birds are quite curious and intelligent, and you can utilize these traits in training as well.

Click here to read more about training your bird

Training in 15 minutes a day

Training your bird should be a relationship building experience and should really be fun and not thought of as hard work. That means you only need a few minutes a day to focus on some of your training tasks so that you bird still finds training fun.

Parrot Secrets is a professional training system that utilizes the idea of less is more in training meaning that you only need up to 15 minutes a day to really begin training your bird or even to undo bad habits he may already have.

Parrot Secrets contains everything you need to know to keep your bird healthy, happy, and well-trained in a four e-book system. Each book contains tips and tricks on health, training, behavior, neat tricks, and more. For a limited time you’ll also receive two fantastic bonus items. First, you’ll get another e-book all about diseases in birds and how to identify and prevent them to keep your bird as healthy as he can be. Second, you’ll receive all access to a members only website for even more information.

Normally this all costs more, but for a limited time you can receive 5 e-books and the member website access for only $17.95.

Learn more about Parrot Secrets and how it can help you

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

The Healthy Parrot

January 12th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

It is currently estimated that there are over 5 million homes in America that have pet parrots and other birds. Even though these brightly colored and highly intelligent creatures are members of the family, they can still unwittingly pass on germs to their human family. There are a few diseases that parrots can pass onto their people:

1. Cryptococcosis

This fungus is typically found in contaminated pigeon droppings and although it is somewhat rare in pet birds, people can still contract it by inhaling the contaminated dust or if the fungus spores land inside an open wound. Parrots can become infected if there are pigeons in their environment; for example pigeon droppings on a window ledge near a parrot’s cage. People who have been contaminated with Cryptococcus will have symptoms that resemble pneumonia: coughing, fever and shortness of breath.

2. Avian Tuberculosis

Avian Tuberculosis is a disease in which bacteria is spread from birds, parrots and other creatures to people. Parrots that are infected with Avian Tuberculosis will show such symptoms as diarrhea, depression, and lethargy and weight loss. Infected animals and birds will actually shed or molt the bacteria in large amounts throughout their environments.

Although scientist are unsure exactly how Avian Tuberculosis is transmitted to humans, they do know that people get from environmental exposure to the bacteria. Those humans affected usually already have a compromised immune system. Symptoms in people include diarrhea, stomach pain, weight loss and being tired all of the time.

3. Parrot Fever

Parrot owners are more susceptible to Parrot Fever than any other pet owner. It is transmitted when a person breaths in the bacterial secretions of an infected parrot, or other psittacine bird, or from wild birds and poultry. Some parrots will show obvious signs of having Parrot Fever; while other parrots may live out their whole life without showing any symptom at all. People with Parrot Fever will experience headaches, muscle aches, fevers, chills, coughing and breathing issues. These symptoms start between five and fourteen days after the person was first exposed.

The best ways to protect yourself, your family, and your pet parrot, is to practice cleanliness and take your parrot in to see the vet for routine Annual Well Bird Exams. Remember to always wash your hands with warm soapy water after you have handled any bird, or touched their droppings. Keeping your parrot’s cage as clean as possible will also be a great benefit.

The Healthy Parrot

Long live the bird!

Click here to learn how to raise a healthy, happy and thriving parrot

Parrots are a lot more delicate than they may first appear. We all know they can and should live decades. Large parrots can live anywhere from about 50-70 years. The smaller birds can even live over 2 decades. Unfortunately, captive caged birds often don’t enjoy as healthy a life and don’t reach these natural lifespans.

Some of the most common reasons a bird won’t be healthy is actually fairly preventable. Viral and bacterial infections can be prevented with proper housing and cleaning and keeping the bird’s stress levels low. Vitamin deficiency and poor nutrition can be avoided with a full, complete, and nutritious diet.

Click here to learn more about how birds can stay healthy

Learn to be observant

Knowing your bird and his everyday normal behavior is one of the best ways to detect a problem. Birds don’t always appear ill until they are seriously ill, but they often exhibit subtle signs that indicate poor health or disease before then. Make sure you know what is normal for your bird but also spend time with your bird and handle him to know what feels normal too.

Nutritional deficiencies can cause respiratory stress or even seizures over time. Parasites, even internal ones, can cause a bird to pick and itch at himself. Pay attention to a change in his stools and droppings. Also take note of how noisy or verbal he normally is because a drop in communication can indicate a problem too.

Read more about what is normal versus abnormal to be prepared

Raising Polly

How can you know all of these things and be prepared? Raising Polly is a book that contains everything you need to know about how to raise a well-adjusted and healthy bird. You’ll learn the basics of nutrition, cage care, stress reduction, training, and more. You’ll know how to take care of your bird to prevent problems as well as how to recognize when a problem happens.

In addition to the e-book Raising Polly, you’ll receive the audiobook version as well as an e-book about training your parrot. All of this is risk free. You’ll have a 60 day no question asked money back guarantee if you’re not happy.

Click here to learn more about Raising Polly and how it can help you

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Learning Your Bird

December 27th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

The holidays are finally here and instead of leaving your beloved parrot in the care of a pet sitter or a boarding facility, you’ve decided to bring your parrot with you when you go home for the holidays.

But is your parrot a good traveler? Here are a few things to consider, along with training suggestions.

1. Has your parrot been properly socialized?

Parrots that have not been properly socialized by their owner will become easily stressed during any type of travel. The noise, the smells, the bustle of activity and all of the strange faces that your parrot will encounter can be too much for some parrots. It is best to start socializing your parrot from a young age. Train them to obey your commands, and to be calm when in new surroundings. Introduce them to as many different people and safe scenarios as possible.

2. Schedule.

Regardless of their species, all parrots easily become accustomed to schedules. During your travel will you be able keep to schedules? If your parrot is used to having dinner at 6pm sharp, will you be able to still give him dinner at 6pm every night while traveling and when you arrive at your destination? Some parrots do not like their schedules to be messed with. A baby bird might have his rest, hygiene, and meals disrupted – and you may have a hard time trying to reestablish such routines.

3. The travel carrier.

Your parrot will need a special travel carrier. Make sure it has a perch and food and water dishes. As soon as you bring the carrier home, allow your parrot to investigate the carrier on his own. Do not rush this! Your parrot must come to accept the carrier as an extension of his cage and should not be forced into it. Otherwise he will become overly stressed every time he sees the carrier. Once your parrot is familiar with the carrier, take a practice run. Load him up in the carrier and go for a car ride. Start short, and keep extending out the travel time. This will help your parrot become used to sounds and motions of the vehicle. Also consider how long your parrot will be in his carrier. You will need to give him extra attention during a road trip so that you can assist him if he becomes too stressed. Parrots can get motion sickness so keep a close eye on your parrot during these practice runs.

4. Health and Legal Issues

Your parrot should be healthy to travel. Since travel causes additional stress, if your parrot is already sick, then traveling might just make him worse. Take him for a well bird exam prior to traveling. If you are planning to travel with your parrot across state lines, you will need to obtain a veterinary health certificate at least 10 days prior to your departure. Depending on your parrot’s species, he may not be allowed in certain states. The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services maintains a Pet Travel section on their website. Here you can research your parrot’s species to see if he is allowed to cross state lines or even countries.

Learning Your Bird

Who is your bird?

Click Here To Receive any or all of these amazing,
groundbreaking training videos.

It might sound strange at first, but the starting point in any training program is to know your bird. What makes him tick? Why does he do what he does? What motivates him?

If you understand what is behind your bird you can go much further in any type of training with him whether that is working on basic training skills like stepping up or on undoing bad behaviors or habits he already has like screaming for attention.

It’s also important to only look at bird related reasons for why he behaves the way he does. What this means is that you shouldn’t ever assign human or other animal behaviors to your bird. Birds aren’t people or dogs, so you want to make sure that you look only at bird characteristics behind behavior.

Click here to learn more about bird behavior

Establishing a training system

Once you’ve learned more about your bird, his motivations, his behavior, and his body language, you can really begin a solid training system. It doesn’t require hours of training, but setting aside a few minutes every day helps not only train your bird but also establish a good, trusting relationship with him.

Trust is a key component in any training program, and a bird that trusts you is more likely to work with you. Punishment, especially any type of physical punishment, should never be part of the equation. That is far more likely to damage your relationship and any trust your bird may have in you.

Training should be positive based, with or without a clicker as a training aid. Use your bird’s motivations and his likes to reward him with when he does good behaviors.

Click here to read more about rewarding good behavior

Using the pros

It never hurts to ask the pros how they do what they do. They’ve learned their knowledge through years of hands-on experience, and Bird Tricks is one such professional bird training system. They’ve learned what motivates many birds. They know what bird language looks like and how it can help guide your training program. You can use their knowledge to help you train your own bird. Professional videos and articles help guide you along the way to establishing your own training program for your bird.

Click here to check out Bird Tricks and free videos

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

What the Power Pause can do for Your Bird

December 19th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

Teaching a parrot to talk requires equal doses of both patience and repetition. Contrary to popular belief, both male and female parrots can be trained to talk. However, the one main caveat here is that before a parrot will even attempt to say its first word or sing its first tune, it must feel absolutely comfortable being around the person who is going to be doing all of the training. There has to be complete trust on both sides.

If you don’t trust your parrot or are worried that he or she may try to bite you during your training sessions, then you will need to work out those issues prior to beginning such training. Likewise, if your parrot is wary of you and tries to run away or hide, or even tries to lash out at you whenever you come near his or her cage, then you will have zero success at teaching your parrot to talk. Your parrot will be more focused on his fear of you and will not learn a word. This may cause you to become stressed and frustrated, which your parrot will pick up on and it will make him or her more fearful of you. Do you see how not having adequate trust between the two of you can lead to a defeating circle?

A couple of weeks before you wish to start training your parrot you should instead start to hang around your parrot more often. Spend time sitting next to your parrot’s cage. Let him or her get used to your body language, movements and voice. Allow your parrot to spend supervised time outside his or her cage – at least two hours per day. Allow his or her confidence in their surroundings to grow naturally.

When trust is no longer an issue, you can then begin teaching your parrot to talk. Make sure that the training sessions are at least 15 minutes, but no longer. You should aim to conduct one training session in the morning and another one in the evening.

Most importantly is to make sure that you have your parrot’s undivided attention, and that he or she has yours as well. You can accomplish this by removing any distractions and sources of noise from your training room. You should repeat the same word over and over again until your parrot has mastered it. Once your parrot is pronouncing the word clearly enough, then you can move on to a new word or phrase.

What the Power Pause can do for Your Bird

Ever wondered how to end biting?

Click Here To Receive any or all of these amazing,
groundbreaking training videos

Birds can become very fearful of being approached or touched, and many react with biting your fingers or hands. It’s a normal reaction in birds since their beak is the only tool they have to try to keep you away.

The only way to help overcome this fearful reaction to being approached or handled is to teach the bird that there is nothing to fear from you. You have to systematically work on making him feel calmer and more comfortable. This takes time, but it can be broken down using the power pause technique.

Click here to learn more about biting in birds

Working through his fears

When you work with your bird and introduce the idea of the power pause, what you are doing is rewarding his calm behavior. Approach your bird and stop several feet short of the bird. As soon as he stops talking and closes his mouth and settles down (and definitely doesn’t try to bite), walk away. His reward is actually having you move away from him. Once he no longer reacts at this distance, you move closer. By working in incremental levels that the bird is comfortable with, you can teach him that you approaching (and eventually touching) is a good thing. You can ultimately stop his biting with this technique.

Click here to learn how to avoid being bitten in parrot training

Additional things to consider

The severity of your bird’s reaction is going to be a big part of the equation. If the bird is a little frightened but settles down fairly quickly, you may be able to give an additional food reward and then retreat. In cases of high levels of fear or anxiety from the bird, you may only be able to retreat (and add food rewards into the equation later).

A clicker is a common training tool that can also be added into your bird training to help with sending your bird a consistent message. It lets the bird know the moment his behavior is correct. In this case, you’d click the bird for remaining calm before retreating. The power pause technique by Bird Tricks utilizes a clicker because the clicker is so useful in training.

Click here to learn more about the Power Pause and Bird Tricks

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

The Talking Bird

December 1st, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

A parrot’s life in captivity always carries with it a certain degree of stress. However, loving and compassionate parrot owners understand this and they act in such a way as to eliminate as much as stress from their captive parrots lives as possible.

The first most important thing that such parrot owners do is to create a calming environment for their parrot. An environment that is quiet and peaceful, and in which parrots feel genuinely safe, will go a long way in maintaining the health and wellbeing of parrots.

Parrots that are kept indoors in cages are often startled by household members and pets walking past their cage, loud television or radio noises, yelling children, barking dogs, and even by seeing birds flying past a window outside.

The easiest way to circumvent all of this is to choose a location for your parrot’s cage that is away from any areas of your home that experiences high traffic, such as a hallway or kitchen. In addition, the ideal cage location should also be away from open windows, as well as loud televisions, radios and other noisy electronic equipment. However, a great quiet spot for your parrot’s
cage should also be near where you will be spending most of your time so that your parrot does not feel alone.

Your parrot might take up screaming to get your attention if you spend most of your time in another room and your parrot can’t see you. Remember, parrots are flock creatures and need to be with their flock – be it human or feathered. If the only ideal location is still in a spot that gets quite a bit of foot traffic, simply place a blanket or towel over three sides of the cage so that your parrot has limited view and will feel more secure.

Another wonderful tip for creating a calming parrot environment is to play soft music for a few minutes before bed, or before and after any training sessions. Try to stick to the same melody. Soon your parrot will be able to associate the serene music with feelings of calmness and peace. A calm parrot is a more trainable parrot! Likewise a calm parrot is overall a much happier parrot!

The added benefit of this is that if you find your parrot becomes nervous or agitated during the day, then all you will need to do is play the chosen melody and it should have a calming effect on your parrot that is immediate.

The Talking Bird

Birds love to talk!

Click Here to Teach Your Parrot To Talk Right NOW

Teaching your bird to talk isn’t always as complicated as you might think. The primary reason is that birds are actually naturally quite chatty, and they enjoy making noise to communicate. In the wild the talking is a way to communicate with other members of the flock. This is especially true of mothers with their young. The babies learn to identify their mother through her vocalizations.

Your bird, even in captivity, is still very much the same wild bird, and he will still want to try and vocalize with you. Especially with parrots, it’s this talking (and screaming) that often gets them in trouble with owners, and it’s also one of the common reasons a parrot may be rehomed.

Click here to read more about parrot communication

Look at your bird’s natural abilities

Rather than think of lots of talking as a negative, why not think of the potential for these birds to learn how to talk in a good way?

Each bird species has different talking abilities. You have to work with the bird you have to best bring out their potential. Some bird types, like parrots and African Greys, excel at mimicking words and can develop very large vocabularies. Other bird types, like cockatiels, can learn words, but they often excel at learning to whistle tunes. If you work with the strengths of your particular bird you can really train him to communicate in a vibrant way!

Click here to learn more about the different types of birds and training

Utilizing professional training tips

How do you know what works best for your bird? Bird Tricks is one way to figure out the best way to train your bird to talk. The Bird Tricks bird professionals know all of the tips, tricks, and even maybe a secret or two on the best way to get your bird to talk. They can share how to bring out the best in your bird!

Click here to learn about teaching a bird to speak

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Parrot Screaming Making Your Ears Hurt?

November 17th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

If you are the devout owner of a colorful parrot then you surely known that their vocal ability can also be quite ‘colorful’. Parrots can screech, scream and cry out more than any other pet. This screaming can not only hurt your ears, but it can also escalate and hurt your chances of renting an apartment or having a roommate.

Parrot screaming is a very bad habit that needs to be nipped in the bud as soon as possible. This can be done using the following tips and suggestions:

Do understand that some screaming is perfectly normal for all parrots and screaming in itself cannot be fully eradicated. Parrots will be at their loudest at both dusk and dawn as part of their flock mentality. This screaming is fine, but any screaming that is too excessive should certainly be stopped.

Be conscious of the way in which you interact with your parrot when they are screaming. Try to reward the screaming with too much attention or drama on your part. Although it is easier said than done, always do your best to actually ignore your parrot’s excessive screams. So do not acknowledge your parrot when they are screaming, and certainly do not look or talk to your parrot either.

It may be easier for you if you can actually walk out of the room once your parrot starts screaming.

Once your parrot does stop screaming for at least a minute or two you should immediately reward him by giving plenty of praise and love. Then slowly increase the time before praising your parrot. Soon your parrot will just opt for the praise and the screaming should subside.

A great alternative to screaming is to teach your parrot to whisper quietly. Parrots are extremely intelligent and once they’ve learned that they will get your attention when the scream you will need to teach them that they will get better attention when they whisper. This can be done by simply teaching your parrot a different sound, phrase or a whistle.

Another great tip is to choose a pleasant sound that your parrot already makes and then encourage your parrot to continue to make it. Whenever he makes that particular sound, be sure to reward him immediately. The reward can be as simple as a praise or attention, or it can be something more meaningful such as his favorite treat or even a new toy. The more attention you give your parrot at this time, the quicker your parrot will stop screaming and instead adopt a more pleasant way to vocalize.

Keep a diary and make a note whenever your parrot screams. Over time you will eventually see a screaming pattern and by notating the screams you will be able to learn what triggers your parrot’s screaming. You can then work to eliminate these triggers from your parrot’s surroundings.

Teach your parrot to talk. A talking parrot is much better to have than a screaming parrot!

Parrot Screaming Making Your Ears Hurt?

Do all parrots make this much noise?

The simple answer is yes. Birds and parrots are just noisy by nature. It’s how they communicate with one another, and that means that making noise is how they talk to you too.

There is more than one reason that a bird may loudly squawk or scream. Trying to grab your attention is only one of those reasons, but it can also be one of the most annoying forms. A bird being territorial is another common reason. Buying a second bird doesn’t really help in either of these situations and can actually make it worse.

Click here to read more about loud vocalizing in birds

Tips for a quieter bird

First, you want to identify why your bird is being so loud. Birds communicate a lot non-verbally too with body language, and there are cues you can learn to pick up on that demonstrate why the screaming is happening.

Second, you want to learn the tips that actually help quiet your bird down. The old school technique of throwing a blanket over a cage doesn’t do a whole lot to comfort or quiet your bird. Training your bird is one technique that always works, and there are a few easy tips you can incorporate right away.

Third, no matter why your bird is screaming certain toys and mental stimulation go a long way to helping quiet your bird. That’s because your bird is happier and more content in his cage. Look for toys he enjoys and that stimulate his natural behaviors. Food dispenser toys or creating opportunities for him to search for food helps to keep his mind busy too.

Click here to read more about training your parrot to quiet down

Parrot Screaming Secrets Revealed

The Parrot Screaming Secrets Revealed from birding professional Chet Womach is a 3 disc course that includes 2 dvds and an audio cd seminar. If you want to really know all the reasons behind your bird and his screaming, you’ll want to check this out. You’ll learn things that can help you easily modify his screaming. There is also 100% money back guarantee for 90 days so there is no risk at all to you!

Click here to learn all about Parrot Screaming Secrets Revealed

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts