Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

All the Bells and Whistles

Friday, July 7th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Some parrots are prone to developing bad habits just like a three year old child is prone to having a tantrum. Just like with a child, a parrot will need to ‘unlearn’ those behaviors and replace them with acceptable ones. Ignorance is not bliss in this case as those bad habits and behaviors can cause your parrot to injure himself or worse. Every parrot can be trained out of their bad habits and behaviors. It is simply a matter of learning how to properly train your parrot and have lots of patience.

Training Recommendations:

Decide on a training time that does not interfere with your family’s busiest times, such as during breakfast or when everyone comes home from school or work.

Set a time limit. A good timeframe for any training session is 20 to 30 minutes. It best to keep them on the shorter side as your parrot may become bored and act out which will have the opposite effect of what
you are trying to accomplish.

Make sure that you are in a calm and relaxed frame of mind before taking your parrot out of their cage to begin a training session. Parrots are sensitive creatures and will mimic your emotions.

Study your parrot’s body language as this will help you to quickly identify when your parrot is stressed out or about to lash out and bite you. Their body language is the only true way in which they can really communicate to you. A stressed out or nervous parrot will not learn anything during a training session simply because they will be too consumed with being stressed out and nervous. Offer your parrot a treat to calm them down.

Positive reinforcement is the best method of training any parrot anything. Immediately after your parrot has obeyed your command or responded to your training request, whether or not he was successful, you should give him a treat or praise. However, if your parrot is not truly following your command or is obviously acting out, it is best to simply ignore him.

Regardless of how frustrated you become, you should never punish your parrot by withholding food or treats or by hitting or throwing things at your parrot. Negative attention, such as in the form of punishment, is still deemed to be attention from you by your parrot and so punishing him will simply condition your parrot to become used to the negative attention which will simply perpetuate his naughty behavior.

Once the allotted time for the training session is completed, return your parrot back to his cage or play stand so that he can have some well-deserved playtime.

All the Bells and Whistles

What to Do?

Click Here To Receive any or all of these amazing,
groundbreaking training videos.

I don’t know if you’re like me or not, but I love birds. I find myself admiring them when in a nearby pet store, but I haven’t taken the plunge yet because I don’t know how to train a bird. It looks like it would be hard, and birds bite!

After doing a little research, I found a system that can teach you, whether you’re a total newbie like me or a more experienced bird handler, how to really work with your bird. It has all the bells and whistles you want in a system!

Find out about this training system

Learning is as Easy as 1-2-3

One of the disadvantages of birds and training was that there was never any easy way to learn how to train them. You could read books, but the odds of finding a professional bird trainer near you are just impossible. And reading a book is just not the same as watching someone show you what to do.

That’s where Bird Tricks comes in. They make learning super easy since they show you what to do through videos and instruction. They even have free training videos. These videos help you learn not only how to train your bird, but also how to work through behavioral problems like biting, screaming, and
feather plucking too.

Click here to learn all about Parrot Training 101 and Bird Tricks

An Established Program

Bird tricks has been successfully used by tons of bird owners who happily share their results.

“In just one week, this badly abused and vicious bird has become the best pet in the world!” one bird lover exclaims. Another says, “Thanks to your training system, my bird is now a loving pet—not just a bird in a cage.”

See what the training system can do for your bird too!

Click here to read more from satisfied bird owners all over the world

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

To Bird School We Go!

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Contrary to popular belief, every parrot can be trained to not only act on command, but to also talk, whistle and sing on command as well. Some parrots can even be trained to roller-skate or to play table-top basketball.

However, this all starts with basic parrot training. Knowing the best way to train your parrot can lead to a happy, well-socialized, and well-trained parrot.

Training your parrot will take plenty of patience and time. Because of this it is very important to know that how you interact with your parrot will have a direct effect on their training and future attitude. Therefore, it is best to always remain positive and upbeat, regardless of how frustrated you might be. And never, ever, yell or throw things at your parrot. Under no circumstances should you smack your parrot either! These can all lead to emotional and physical harm, and borders on animal abuse.

Keep the training sessions always short, sweet and to the point. This will help keep things interesting and fun for both of you and will avoid any boredom ruts.

Another thing not to do is to withhold your parrot’s food, either as punishment or for training. Instead, use their food, or favorite treat, as a training aid - a reward for learning a new word, a new command or even for just attempting a new trick.

After your training session is done, let your parrot go back into their cage so that he or she can rest for a little while and have something to eat and drink. You should wait between 30 minutes to an hour before bringing him or her out of their cage to start another training session. Keep these training session to 2 - 3 per day. More than that and your parrot will start to feel stressed out.

When training your parrot, remember to play with your parrot as well. All work and no play, will make your parrot resent their training. For every training session you do together, make sure you have a play session as well.

To Bird School We Go!

What Are You Doing in 2012?

Click here to see easy ways to train your parrot

Do you have a New Year’s resolution yet? Maybe you’re thinking about the classic ones we all hear about: eat better, lose weight, and exercise more. I’ve got a better resolution idea for you: develop a better relationship with your bird!

Click here to learn more about changing your relationship with your bird

A New Bird Outlook

Although your bird can’t have a resolution, you and he can work on this one together for a better 2012. Even if you don’t think there is a single thing wrong with your bird, wouldn’t you like to learn new training skills and techniques that you can use to teach your bird new tricks?

Learning how to train your bird in a positive and consistent manner will allow you to teach your bird all kinds of neat tricks. It will also help you work with your bird to change your relationship and make a better one….that means you can change any bad behaviors like screaming at you, biting you, or plucking out his feathers.

Click here to see how training can help your bird

See How to Do It

Take a look at videos that show you firsthand how to train your bird. Sometimes it’s easier to see exactly how to do it rather than read about it. Now you can have access to free videos that show you how to problem solve to change your bird’s behavior and also teach him new things too!

Click here to begin watching free bird videos

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Quick and Easy Bird Training Tips

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Quick and Easy Bird Training Tips

It’s all about a pattern

Click here to see how easy it really is to have a
happy, healthy and obedient parrot

Have you ever wondered why your bird behaves the way he does? There are a few common reasons that are at the core of all of his behaviors, but the first one is that he learns about his world in patterns. It’s pretty simple, really. He learns that certain behaviors are rewarded in a positive way so he wants to continue doing them, and he learns that other behaviors are punished (have bad consequences) and he tries not to do those again.

In training your parrot you always want to encourage him to repeat behaviors with positive interactions and rewards. Anything your bird views as scary, painful, or otherwise punishing he will come to fear and avoid. You don’t want your bird to avoid you out of fear, so always make sure your interactions are positive and enjoyable for both of you.

Learn more about behavioral basics of parrotst

Instincts can rule the day

One of the other primary reasons he does what he does is out of instinct. Birds come hardwired to have certain instinctual behaviors about them, and instincts are pretty darn hard to unwire. For example, it’s common and normal for your parrot to be fairly vocal and use his voice to communicate with you. You can’t have a silent parrot, but you can work on not doing things that encourage the bad and loud screaming. Training will always be about bringing out your best bird, and that means making it match with what comes naturally to your bird. Luckily, birds are quite curious and intelligent, and you can utilize these traits in training as well.

Click here to read more about training your bird

Training in 15 minutes a day

Training your bird should be a relationship building experience and should really be fun and not thought of as hard work. That means you only need a few minutes a day to focus on some of your training tasks so that you bird still finds training fun.

Parrot Secrets is a professional training system that utilizes the idea of less is more in training meaning that you only need up to 15 minutes a day to really begin training your bird or even to undo bad habits he may already have.

Parrot Secrets contains everything you need to know to keep your bird healthy, happy, and well-trained in a four e-book system. Each book contains tips and tricks on health, training, behavior, neat tricks, and more. For a limited time you’ll also receive two fantastic bonus items. First, you’ll get another e-book all about diseases in birds and how to identify and prevent them to keep your bird as healthy as he can be. Second, you’ll receive all access to a members only website for even more information.

Normally this all costs more, but for a limited time you can receive 5 e-books and the member website access for only $17.95.

Learn more about Parrot Secrets and how it can help you

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Learning Your Bird

Tuesday, December 27th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

The holidays are finally here and instead of leaving your beloved parrot in the care of a pet sitter or a boarding facility, you’ve decided to bring your parrot with you when you go home for the holidays.

But is your parrot a good traveler? Here are a few things to consider, along with training suggestions.

1. Has your parrot been properly socialized?

Parrots that have not been properly socialized by their owner will become easily stressed during any type of travel. The noise, the smells, the bustle of activity and all of the strange faces that your parrot will encounter can be too much for some parrots. It is best to start socializing your parrot from a young age. Train them to obey your commands, and to be calm when in new surroundings. Introduce them to as many different people and safe scenarios as possible.

2. Schedule.

Regardless of their species, all parrots easily become accustomed to schedules. During your travel will you be able keep to schedules? If your parrot is used to having dinner at 6pm sharp, will you be able to still give him dinner at 6pm every night while traveling and when you arrive at your destination? Some parrots do not like their schedules to be messed with. A baby bird might have his rest, hygiene, and meals disrupted – and you may have a hard time trying to reestablish such routines.

3. The travel carrier.

Your parrot will need a special travel carrier. Make sure it has a perch and food and water dishes. As soon as you bring the carrier home, allow your parrot to investigate the carrier on his own. Do not rush this! Your parrot must come to accept the carrier as an extension of his cage and should not be forced into it. Otherwise he will become overly stressed every time he sees the carrier. Once your parrot is familiar with the carrier, take a practice run. Load him up in the carrier and go for a car ride. Start short, and keep extending out the travel time. This will help your parrot become used to sounds and motions of the vehicle. Also consider how long your parrot will be in his carrier. You will need to give him extra attention during a road trip so that you can assist him if he becomes too stressed. Parrots can get motion sickness so keep a close eye on your parrot during these practice runs.

4. Health and Legal Issues

Your parrot should be healthy to travel. Since travel causes additional stress, if your parrot is already sick, then traveling might just make him worse. Take him for a well bird exam prior to traveling. If you are planning to travel with your parrot across state lines, you will need to obtain a veterinary health certificate at least 10 days prior to your departure. Depending on your parrot’s species, he may not be allowed in certain states. The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services maintains a Pet Travel section on their website. Here you can research your parrot’s species to see if he is allowed to cross state lines or even countries.

Learning Your Bird

Who is your bird?

Click Here To Receive any or all of these amazing,
groundbreaking training videos.

It might sound strange at first, but the starting point in any training program is to know your bird. What makes him tick? Why does he do what he does? What motivates him?

If you understand what is behind your bird you can go much further in any type of training with him whether that is working on basic training skills like stepping up or on undoing bad behaviors or habits he already has like screaming for attention.

It’s also important to only look at bird related reasons for why he behaves the way he does. What this means is that you shouldn’t ever assign human or other animal behaviors to your bird. Birds aren’t people or dogs, so you want to make sure that you look only at bird characteristics behind behavior.

Click here to learn more about bird behavior

Establishing a training system

Once you’ve learned more about your bird, his motivations, his behavior, and his body language, you can really begin a solid training system. It doesn’t require hours of training, but setting aside a few minutes every day helps not only train your bird but also establish a good, trusting relationship with him.

Trust is a key component in any training program, and a bird that trusts you is more likely to work with you. Punishment, especially any type of physical punishment, should never be part of the equation. That is far more likely to damage your relationship and any trust your bird may have in you.

Training should be positive based, with or without a clicker as a training aid. Use your bird’s motivations and his likes to reward him with when he does good behaviors.

Click here to read more about rewarding good behavior

Using the pros

It never hurts to ask the pros how they do what they do. They’ve learned their knowledge through years of hands-on experience, and Bird Tricks is one such professional bird training system. They’ve learned what motivates many birds. They know what bird language looks like and how it can help guide your training program. You can use their knowledge to help you train your own bird. Professional videos and articles help guide you along the way to establishing your own training program for your bird.

Click here to check out Bird Tricks and free videos

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

What the Power Pause can do for Your Bird

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

Teaching a parrot to talk requires equal doses of both patience and repetition. Contrary to popular belief, both male and female parrots can be trained to talk. However, the one main caveat here is that before a parrot will even attempt to say its first word or sing its first tune, it must feel absolutely comfortable being around the person who is going to be doing all of the training. There has to be complete trust on both sides.

If you don’t trust your parrot or are worried that he or she may try to bite you during your training sessions, then you will need to work out those issues prior to beginning such training. Likewise, if your parrot is wary of you and tries to run away or hide, or even tries to lash out at you whenever you come near his or her cage, then you will have zero success at teaching your parrot to talk. Your parrot will be more focused on his fear of you and will not learn a word. This may cause you to become stressed and frustrated, which your parrot will pick up on and it will make him or her more fearful of you. Do you see how not having adequate trust between the two of you can lead to a defeating circle?

A couple of weeks before you wish to start training your parrot you should instead start to hang around your parrot more often. Spend time sitting next to your parrot’s cage. Let him or her get used to your body language, movements and voice. Allow your parrot to spend supervised time outside his or her cage – at least two hours per day. Allow his or her confidence in their surroundings to grow naturally.

When trust is no longer an issue, you can then begin teaching your parrot to talk. Make sure that the training sessions are at least 15 minutes, but no longer. You should aim to conduct one training session in the morning and another one in the evening.

Most importantly is to make sure that you have your parrot’s undivided attention, and that he or she has yours as well. You can accomplish this by removing any distractions and sources of noise from your training room. You should repeat the same word over and over again until your parrot has mastered it. Once your parrot is pronouncing the word clearly enough, then you can move on to a new word or phrase.

What the Power Pause can do for Your Bird

Ever wondered how to end biting?

Click Here To Receive any or all of these amazing,
groundbreaking training videos

Birds can become very fearful of being approached or touched, and many react with biting your fingers or hands. It’s a normal reaction in birds since their beak is the only tool they have to try to keep you away.

The only way to help overcome this fearful reaction to being approached or handled is to teach the bird that there is nothing to fear from you. You have to systematically work on making him feel calmer and more comfortable. This takes time, but it can be broken down using the power pause technique.

Click here to learn more about biting in birds

Working through his fears

When you work with your bird and introduce the idea of the power pause, what you are doing is rewarding his calm behavior. Approach your bird and stop several feet short of the bird. As soon as he stops talking and closes his mouth and settles down (and definitely doesn’t try to bite), walk away. His reward is actually having you move away from him. Once he no longer reacts at this distance, you move closer. By working in incremental levels that the bird is comfortable with, you can teach him that you approaching (and eventually touching) is a good thing. You can ultimately stop his biting with this technique.

Click here to learn how to avoid being bitten in parrot training

Additional things to consider

The severity of your bird’s reaction is going to be a big part of the equation. If the bird is a little frightened but settles down fairly quickly, you may be able to give an additional food reward and then retreat. In cases of high levels of fear or anxiety from the bird, you may only be able to retreat (and add food rewards into the equation later).

A clicker is a common training tool that can also be added into your bird training to help with sending your bird a consistent message. It lets the bird know the moment his behavior is correct. In this case, you’d click the bird for remaining calm before retreating. The power pause technique by Bird Tricks utilizes a clicker because the clicker is so useful in training.

Click here to learn more about the Power Pause and Bird Tricks

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

The Talking Bird

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

A parrot’s life in captivity always carries with it a certain degree of stress. However, loving and compassionate parrot owners understand this and they act in such a way as to eliminate as much as stress from their captive parrots lives as possible.

The first most important thing that such parrot owners do is to create a calming environment for their parrot. An environment that is quiet and peaceful, and in which parrots feel genuinely safe, will go a long way in maintaining the health and wellbeing of parrots.

Parrots that are kept indoors in cages are often startled by household members and pets walking past their cage, loud television or radio noises, yelling children, barking dogs, and even by seeing birds flying past a window outside.

The easiest way to circumvent all of this is to choose a location for your parrot’s cage that is away from any areas of your home that experiences high traffic, such as a hallway or kitchen. In addition, the ideal cage location should also be away from open windows, as well as loud televisions, radios and other noisy electronic equipment. However, a great quiet spot for your parrot’s
cage should also be near where you will be spending most of your time so that your parrot does not feel alone.

Your parrot might take up screaming to get your attention if you spend most of your time in another room and your parrot can’t see you. Remember, parrots are flock creatures and need to be with their flock – be it human or feathered. If the only ideal location is still in a spot that gets quite a bit of foot traffic, simply place a blanket or towel over three sides of the cage so that your parrot has limited view and will feel more secure.

Another wonderful tip for creating a calming parrot environment is to play soft music for a few minutes before bed, or before and after any training sessions. Try to stick to the same melody. Soon your parrot will be able to associate the serene music with feelings of calmness and peace. A calm parrot is a more trainable parrot! Likewise a calm parrot is overall a much happier parrot!

The added benefit of this is that if you find your parrot becomes nervous or agitated during the day, then all you will need to do is play the chosen melody and it should have a calming effect on your parrot that is immediate.

The Talking Bird

Birds love to talk!

Click Here to Teach Your Parrot To Talk Right NOW

Teaching your bird to talk isn’t always as complicated as you might think. The primary reason is that birds are actually naturally quite chatty, and they enjoy making noise to communicate. In the wild the talking is a way to communicate with other members of the flock. This is especially true of mothers with their young. The babies learn to identify their mother through her vocalizations.

Your bird, even in captivity, is still very much the same wild bird, and he will still want to try and vocalize with you. Especially with parrots, it’s this talking (and screaming) that often gets them in trouble with owners, and it’s also one of the common reasons a parrot may be rehomed.

Click here to read more about parrot communication

Look at your bird’s natural abilities

Rather than think of lots of talking as a negative, why not think of the potential for these birds to learn how to talk in a good way?

Each bird species has different talking abilities. You have to work with the bird you have to best bring out their potential. Some bird types, like parrots and African Greys, excel at mimicking words and can develop very large vocabularies. Other bird types, like cockatiels, can learn words, but they often excel at learning to whistle tunes. If you work with the strengths of your particular bird you can really train him to communicate in a vibrant way!

Click here to learn more about the different types of birds and training

Utilizing professional training tips

How do you know what works best for your bird? Bird Tricks is one way to figure out the best way to train your bird to talk. The Bird Tricks bird professionals know all of the tips, tricks, and even maybe a secret or two on the best way to get your bird to talk. They can share how to bring out the best in your bird!

Click here to learn about teaching a bird to speak

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Bird Training Perfection

Monday, October 24th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

Whether you are a new parrot owner or have owned parrots for many years, you most likely want to teach your parrot to do all sorts of tricks. Obviously the most important tricks are actually just simple commands that every captive parrot should know. Commands such as ‘Step Up’ or ‘Step Down’. When said aloud to your parrot, these commands should elicit the parrot’s response of stepping up onto your finger, or stepping down onto a perch.

Another important command to teach your parrot is for him to come to you whenever you call him. To your friends and family members, these types of activities may appear to be tricks that your parrot has learned; however they are actually commands that you have taught your parrot to respond to in a particular fashion.

An alternative trick to teach your parrot is to sit on your shoulder. And no, this type of training is not so that you can parade your parrot around on your shoulder as part of Pirate Halloween costume! Shoulder training helps to strengthen a bond between you and your bird.

Shoulder training consists of a few basic steps:

  • Before you begin, you must make sure that your parrot is completely trustworthy and is also trusting of your hand. Your parrot should know the ‘Step Up’ and ‘Step Down’ commands and obey them every single time.
  • Using the ‘Step Up’ command, have your parrot step up onto your finger, hand, or stick perch.
  • Using the ‘Step Down’ command, ask your parrot to step down onto your shoulder.
  • Allow your parrot plenty of time to become at ease sitting on your shoulder. Make sure you are seated in a comfortable chair and do not attempt to get up or move around the room during the first few training sessions.
  • When you feel your parrot is well trained and that he sits on your shoulder happily without trying to climb or fly off, then you can slowly start to walk around with your parrot on your shoulder.

However, here are a few warnings when shoulder training:

  • Remove earrings, necklaces and other jewelry from your face and neck before letting your parrot sit on your shoulder.
  • Wear an old T-shirt. Your parrot may poop on you.
  • When walking around with your parrot on your shoulder, do so slowly and deliberately and make sure you trim your parrot’s nails. As you walk, your parrot will use his nails to grip onto your shoulder to keep his balance.

Bird Training Perfection

How everyone learns

Click here to see easy ways to train your parrot

Every living animal, including us, has a basic learning style. When we receive a reward we enjoy for a behavior, we do it more often. When we receive a consequence we don’t enjoy, we attempt to avoid doing a behavior.

For humans, rewards and consequences are often less tangible and more varied. For example, most people volunteer to do community service at least partly because they find the experience rewarding for them too.

With our pet animals, the rewards and consequences are more concrete when you look at the patterns. All learning is pattern based. For example, if the same
person is always handling the bird for something he doesn’t like or is afraid of you should see clearly that he avoids this person or perhaps appears to downright not like this person. These things can all be reversed through training and looking at the available rewards.

Click here to learn more information about bird training

How to increase behaviors

The easiest way to increase the good behavior in your bird is to clearly reward that behavior. Sounds obvious, right? But it’s not always that clear, especially if you haven’t trained a lot of animals before.

What is rewarding for your bird? Every individual likes something different. Food, attention, and touch are all possibly good rewards, but your bird may
respond to different foods, different forms of touch, etc. than another bird. Learn what he likes and then use those things to encourage the behavior you want to see more of.

Click here to read more about increasing good behavior

The trick to training

There isn’t just one single trick to training your bird. It’s a process, but it’s a whole lot easier with professional training on your side. Tools like clickers are a mainstay of the training process for both reinforcing good behaviors in your bird and also for training a variety of new behaviors and tricks. This may seem like a tricky tool at first, but it’s really quite simple with a little instruction

The bird professionals at Bird Tricks have years and years of bird training experience, and they can easily break down the training tools and principles for you. There are a variety of options available to assist you, but definitely you want to include Bird Tricks as one of your training tools.

Click here to check out Bird Tricks

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

The Secret to Parrot Training

Friday, September 9th, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

The Secret to Parrot Training

So you got a bird ….

Click here to see how easy it really is to have a
happy, healthy and obedient parrot

Now what do you do? The best answer is to begin establishing a relationship with your bird. What if you already have a bird with problems? Then you begin training to both correct the behavior problems and to establish a different relationship with your bird.

Birds establish bonds with their humans when there are no other birds around. These bonds can be very strong, and in some cases can even be problematic. For example, there are many birds that attempt to become possessive over a specific person such as a husband and then the bird bites the wife!

Training is the #1 best way to work on behavioral issues and give your bird a new way of behaving with you and communicating with you.

Click here to learn about developing a new and better relationship with your bird

Working with your bird’s natural birdiness

Simply put, it’s always best to work with your bird’s natural abilities and understand where his behaviors come from. For example, birds are naturally very vocal. This can translate into talking, whistling, or singing or it can translate into a whole lot of screaming. Understanding that your bird is going to make noise helps to not accidentally encourage bad noise and instead give your bird alternate ways to communicate.

Parrot Secrets is a professional bird system that helps you look at what comes naturally to your bird ….intelligence, curiosity, the desire to explore things with his beak, deep bonding with his human, and vocalizing, for example….and to use these things to help better train your bird. In just spending 15 minutes a day on training your bird you can help to develop a bird that is a true delight to spend time with.

The “secret” to the Parrot Secrets system

The secret is that there aren’t any real secrets! Actually, it’s just common bird experience and knowledge gained from bird professionals with years of experience. Parrot Secrets is full of information that these professionals have learned throughout the years and want to pass along.

The 4 e-book system covers a wealth of information such as:

Book One: All about getting the talking going! Learn what might be preventing your bird from speaking as well as tricks and techniques to help him develop his vocabulary.

Book Two: Developing the bond with your bird and working on any pesky behavior problems.

Book Three: Your bird’s diet. What you should be feeding him to keep him healthy.

Book Four: Taking a look at what makes the perfect bird to purchase.

For a limited time you’ll also receive special bonus offers as part of the low sale price of $17.95.
You’ll receive an additional e-book about parrot care as well as special access to the Parrot Secrets members’ only website. This website offers a ton more expert advice and information, and it’s free with the system! Lastly, this is all no-risk to try for you as it’s guaranteed money-back for 120 days if you’re not totally satisfied.

Click here to check out Parrot Secrets

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Noisy Birds!

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

Training your parrot to whistle is about the same as training your parrot to talk. The main ingredient in this so-called secret recipe is simple repetition. Generally speaking, in the wild, parrots are extremely social creatures and love to communicate with each other by making a variety of different chirps and squawks. This innate desire doesn’t just go away because your parrot is raised in a home.

Instead, it will be up to you as your parrot’s flock leader, to continue to emulate your parrot’s natural surroundings. This can be done by socializing your parrot at a young age and teaching him certain socially-approved skills such as obeying commands and even talking.

But not every parrot owner desires a parrot that talks. In these cases, parrots can be taught how to whistle instead. The great thing here, is that it is oftentimes easier for a parrot to learn to whistle before he learns to talk. And once a parrot has become comfortable with whistling and is confident of his new skills as a whistler, he will whistle as a means of communication with you.

There are five simple steps to training your parrot to whistle:

1. Create a safe space for your parrot in which you can be guaranteed to have his undivided attention. This goes the same for you: make sure that your parrot has your undivided attention as well. No distractions. This chosen space should be quiet with no interference from televisions, radios, or other household pets and family members.

2. Once your parrot has settled down in the safe space you have created, make sure that you make eye contact with him to hold his attention. Whistle your chosen tune while maintaining eye contact with your parrot. It is quite crucial that your parrot immediately understands that you are attempting to direct your whistle to him, i.e. that you are communicating with your parrot via this unique sound.

3. All parrots learn best when their training is repeated to them. This holds especially true with training your parrot to whistle. You must repeat the chosen tune over and over again. Make sure you are repeating the whistle using the same tones all the time.

4. Once your training session is over for the day, continue whistling the tune whenever you can, especially when you are interacting with your parrot. When your parrot is confident enough, he will then attempt to repeat the whistle by himself.

5. Now you are ready to teach your parrot to associate your chosen whistle with a chosen activity. Before you give your parrot a treat next time, whistle your chosen whistle. Over time your parrot will recognize that whenever he hears that whistle, he will get a wonderful treat from you.

Noisy Birds!

Birds just like chatting

Click here for the exciting details of this ‘Real Speech’ System

Parrots and other bird species love to talk and make a variety of noises. It comes quite naturally to them as a form of communication both with other birds and with humans. While this can become an annoying habit sometimes, particularly if your bird begins to vocalize loudly for attention, it can also be a great way to communicate and bond with your bird.

Birds use sounds to communicate with other flock members. It helps them locate members of the same flock, and parent birds communicate with baby birds using unique sounds. In the absence of other birds your pet bird will want to attempt to communicate with you too, and he may attempt to mimic words or sounds you make in a similar way he would with other birds.

Click here to learn more about how birds communicate with one another

Not every bird is alike

Some species of birds are more naturally inclined for certain types of noises. For example, many think that the cockatiel is a natural for singing and whistling which means they are excellent at repeating different tunes they might hear. Amazon parrots and African Greys are well known for their ability to repeat words and some can even sing with words included. They often develop larger vocabularies because of this natural inclination.

Click here to learn what birds are the best talkers

Teaching birds to vocalize

Teaching your bird to speak is often one of the first things someone wants to do with their pet bird. It’s a neat trick and can be a fun bonding experience too. It can also be a gateway to wanting to train your bird to do other things.

There are a few things to consider:

1. Be realistic in your goals. Consider what type of bird you have and start with something easy that comes more naturally for your bird species.

2. Make it fun and easy. Training isn’t supposed to be hard! Keep training very simple for your bird and always keep it positive.

3. Reward any attempts your bird makes. It might not be the full whistling song or words you expected, but your bird is trying so be sure to reward any of these attempts. He’ll get there!

Read more training tips for your bird

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Tips for a Trained Bird

Friday, July 1st, 2016

Dear Parrot Lover,

Adopting a parrot that has been previously owned by someone else can be scary. After all, it is probably safe to assume that there will be some issues, but you are not aware of what these issues are upfront. Listed below is a few suggestions in effectively training your second hand parrot.

1. Before you agree to the adoption, do as much digging as you can about the parrot’s past. Speak with his previous owners. Get them to tell you in their own words, exactly what the parrot’s personality is like. Ask them if the parrot has any habits or likes certain things done a certain way. Obtain the parrot’s veterinarian contact information and give them a call too. Ask the vet about the parrot’s general health. Finding out as much about the parrot beforehand will help you step into second hand parrot ownership more easily.

2. The very first thing you need to be aware of is that undoubtedly, your new parrot will come with plenty of old baggage. It will be your job to figure out what that baggage is, and then help your parrot to release that baggage. This means that, in the beginning, it may take your parrot a few weeks before he feels comfortable enough to trust you. Always move slowly and carefully around your second hand parrot. If you move too fast you may scare him and set back his trust.

3. Regardless of his history, and how we was treated, or mistreated, at his former home, you will need to show your second hand parrot that his new home with you will be much better and very different. Try to see things from his bird’s eye view: he’s just been placed in a second home (maybe even for the third or fourth time), he’s around new people, he has new fun toys, a new and improved diet, and maybe even a new cage.

4. If the parrot’s old cage is rusty, broken, or too small for him to realistically hold out both of his wings and turn around in the cage without either of the wings touching the sides of the cage – then his cage is too small and you must replace it immediately. Always buy the biggest cage you can afford. Start his new life with you on the right track by outfitting his new cage with new toys that will help him forage, have fun on his own, and stimulate his mind.

5. Your second hand parrot may not want to, or be used to, being touched by people. This means he may not know how to respond appropriately to the Step Up command. Use a dowel rod to train him this command and eventually work up to gently petting his head and back. The more you interact with him, the quicker he will learn to trust you. Remember that your second hand parrot will tire easily at first. So be prepared in the beggining to keep any interactions and training sessions short and sweet so that he can get plenty of rest. As your parrot starts to trust you more, you can slowly start to increase the training sessions.

Tips for a Trained Bird

How smart are birds?

Click here to see easy ways to train your parrot

Birds, especially parrots and birds like crows and ravens, are really intelligent. Many birds mimic our speech and sounds fairly well, but this isn’t accepted as true intelligence. Understanding a word and being able to associate it with the meaning of the word shows higher intelligence, and it’s generally considered that some birds, like African Greys, are capable of this task.

According to Audubon, scientists now think that crows are as smart as the average 7 year old child. How’s that for a smart bird? Researchers use an 8 step test to help determine how a bird is thinking. Many of the tasks require a bird to figure out how to get a piece of food. For example, can he determine which color of string is attached to the piece of food and pull the right one when there are two choices of string? These tests help determine reasoning and problem solving skills.

Click here to learn more about bird intelligenc

Utilizing your bird’s intelligence

There are many ways to train a bird, but one of the easiest ways capitalizes on his intelligence. It’s called rewarding him for doing good behaviors you like so that he figures out what behaviors work best. Do you like it more when he is quiet? Try providing attention to him when he is being quiet all on his own rather than getting upset and even yelling when he is screaming.

You can also use other methods commonly used in other forms of animal training such as the use of a clicker. Lure training can also be used. This is when you use a piece of food to encourage him into the right behavior until he learns what you’re asking him to do.

Read more about what ways to train your bird

Professional bird training

There are a lot of tips to make training your bird easier. Someone with years of experience knows the best tips to save you a lot of time and possible frustration. The bird professionals at Bird Tricks have spent years learning what works and doesn’t for things like correcting behavioral problems but also for training tricks.

This information can be quickly accessed through videos and articles to help you start out the right way with training your bird.

Click here to learn more about the Bird Tricks training system

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts