Archive for June, 2014

Preventing Early Deaths in Birds

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

Dear Parrot Lover,

There are many beautiful animals throughout the world, but none are as stunning, and as intelligent as the parrot. Parrots come in a variety of sizes, colors, and species. Some have the intelligence of a two year old toddler, while others are on the same intellectual level as three to four year old child.

In fact, they are so intelligent that they are extremely adept at hiding their true physical wellbeing. In the wild, parrots are always a member of a larger flock. In addition, in such a large group of birds, if one bird is sick or injured, the others will pick up on that and may abandon the bird. In some instances, larger prey will also notice that the bird is sick or injured and will immediately target it as food.

This natural instinct to hide their real health has carried over into domesticated parrots and birds too.

As a responsible parrot owner, it is your duty to provide your parrot with proper health care throughout its life. Start by learning to notice your parrot’s natural behavior patterns. What are his or her unique quirks?

Once you know what his or her unique characteristics are, it will be much easier for you to notice when your parrot is not feeling well, simply because he or she will not be acting like their usual self. Learn to recognize certain traits and body language that are indicative of a sick or injured parrot. These usually include a tail feather that droops or that hangs down lower than the rest of your parrot’s body when they are sitting on their perch. Or sitting with their feathers all puffed up. Other indications are a lack of appetite, a change in the color, smell, and consistency of their droppings; and in some parrots, being less vocal and talkative that normal.

For these reasons, it is vitally important that your parrot is seen by an Avian Certified Veterinarian every six months to a year. An Avian Certified Veterinarian is the only veterinarian that is educated to conduct what is known as a Well Bird Exam.

Similar to a dog or cat checkup, a Well Bird Exam will test your parrot’s fecal matter and blood for signs of any parasites or infections. They will be weighed on a special scale designed especially for parrots. The Avian Certified Veterinarian may suggest that your parrot receive a vaccination against the Polyomavirus – a type of cold that only parrots can contract.

In any event, it is always a good idea to create a rapport with your veterinarian so that both you and your parrot will become familiar with the vet.

Taking Care of Your Parrot

Learn How to Care for Your Pet Bird

Did you know that every parrot or bird we see in someone’s home or in a store is, at best, only a few generations removed from the wild? That means knowing what the wild tendencies in any bird are and how to properly care for it in your home is vital for his health.

Parrots can live up to 60 years or more if their needs are fully met, but many birds unfortunately die much younger than that due to incomplete or poor diets or illness.  These are preventable things!

Learn How to Care for Your Pet Bird

Fulfilling Your Parrot’s Needs

Every parrot has certain needs that you want to meet to keep him happy and healthy:

Parrots are very intelligent, and wild parrots use their intelligence to roam, explore, and learn.  It’s estimated that the common parrot may have an intelligence similar to a 3-5 year old child! This means you need to allot a few hours each day to having your bird with you outside of the cage and provide mentally stimulating toys and activities for him the remainder of the day.

His diet needs to be diverse and complete with fresh fruit, veggies, bird food pellets, and different nuts and seeds.  Simple bird seed is not enough to keep him healthy.  Poor nutrition can cause a non-thrifty bird.

The cage environment can be a breeding ground for disease and parasites.  Birds are messy, and it requires daily cleaning to properly maintain.  A poorly placed cage that isn’t clean is a disaster waiting to happen for a bird.

These are the three basic needs that every pet parrot must have: mental and physical stimulation each day, a complete diet, and a clean living environment.

Read more on How to Take Care of Your Parrot

Raising Polly!

It can be so challenging to have all the information you readily need at your fingertips.  You want to know the ins and outs of parrot ownership as well as all the tricks of the trade to keep him healthy and happy.  How to narrow down all the information you run across on the internet and boil it down to the information you need?

Raising Polly: How to Raise a Healthy, Happy, Well Adjusted Bird is one of those books that you can hang onto, ready through, and reference from time to time.  The Raising Polly system was developed by a bird owner and breeder with over two decades of experience.  It’s guaranteed to work!

In addition to the Raising Polly e-book, you’ll receive audio files and a bonus book on training your bird, Training Your Parrot…all risk free to you!

Click here to read more on How to Take Care of Your Parrot

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

Meeting Your Parrot’s Needs

Sunday, June 1st, 2014

Dear Parrot Lover,

With the increase in popularity of parrots as pets, it is necessary to educate parrot owners on how to properly raise their parrot. Parrots that are not raised correctly from the time they are weaned, have the opportunity to grow into disobedient and mean parrots.

Here are a few healthy parrot raising tips:

  1. The decision to own a parrot should not be based on the pretty colors of a bird. Do your due diligence and research all of the commonly owned and domesticated parrots that are available. Although parrots each have their own unique personalities, each species also have general characteristics too. Use these characteristics to help you decide which species of parrot will be best suited for your lifestyle. For example, larger parrots like Macaws will need more attention and training, whilst a budgie does not require such extensive care. Budgies are quite happy to be left alone, but Macaws will get very upset if you ignore them!
  2. Once you have decided on a species, your next step should be to speak with as many breeders as you can. Although they will each have a different perspective on raising parrots, they should at least all agree on a few points such as personality, diet, socialization requirements, health, etc.  Narrow the breeders down until you have selected two or three and ask them if you can visit them. Some will let you visit but will not allow you into the nursery – this is for the safety of the baby parrots.  At the very least, the breeder should let you meet with their breeder parrots. This will give you an idea of how well cared for the baby parrots are. It is best to purchase a baby parrot from a reputable breeder rather than from a pet shop; but do not let this persuade you from providing a loving and caring home for a pet-shop parrot if you find one.
  3. Some breeders and pet shops will let you choose your pick from a flock of baby birds. Make sure you choose wisely. Steer clear of a parrot with signs of malnutrition or physical abuse; unless you are up for the challenge of caring for them and rehabilitating them. A malnourished parrot will appear as if they have very sharp breastbones, but in actuality, their overall muscle mass has actually decreased due to not eating right. A healthy parrot’s feathers should look soft and shiny with no signs of plucking; and their eyes and nostrils should be clear with no discharge.
  4. A happy parrot is a well-socialized parrot. Make sure you continue socializing your parrot from the minute you bring him or her home. In the wild, parrots are always in the company of other flock members; try to copy this by encouraging your parrot to interact with every member of your family.
    1. There are a few important commands that you must teach your parrot. These will help you in not only taking better care of your parrot, but also will help him or her become better socialized. One of the first commands must be the ‘step up’ command – gently push your finger against your parrot’s breastbone – this will make him or her feel like they are going to fall off their perch and will instinctively step up onto your finger. Repeat these steps until your parrot voluntarily steps up onto your finger or a perch when you say ‘step up’.

The Wild in the Parrot

Learn more about birds and their needs

Did you know that every parrot or bird we see in someone’s home or in a store is, at best, only a few generations removed from the wild? That means knowing what the wild tendencies in any bird are and how to properly care for it in your home is vital for his health.

Parrots can live up to 60 years or more if their needs are fully met, but many birds unfortunately die much younger than that due to incomplete or poor diets or illness.  These are preventable things!

Learn more about birds and their needs

Fulfilling Your Parrot’s Needs

Every parrot has certain needs that you want to meet to keep him happy and healthy:

Parrots are very intelligent, and wild parrots use their intelligence to roam, explore, and learn.  It’s estimated that the common parrot may have an intelligence similar to a 3-5 year old child! This means you need to allot a few hours each day to having your bird with you outside of the cage and provide mentally stimulating toys and activities for him the remainder of the day.

His diet needs to be diverse and complete with fresh fruit, veggies, bird food pellets, and different nuts and seeds.  Simple bird seed is not enough to keep him healthy.  Poor nutrition can cause a non-thrifty bird.

The cage environment can be a breeding ground for disease and parasites.  Birds are messy, and it requires daily cleaning to properly maintain.  A poorly placed cage that isn’t clean is a disaster waiting to happen for a bird.

These are the three basic needs that every pet parrot must have: mental and physical stimulation each day, a complete diet, and a clean living environment.

Read more about maintaining the proper living conditions for your parrot

Raising Polly!

It can be so challenging to have all the information you readily need at your fingertips.  You want to know the ins and outs of parrot ownership as well as all the tricks of the trade to keep him healthy and happy.  How to narrow down all the information you run across on the internet and boil it down to the information you need?

Raising Polly: How to Raise a Healthy, Happy, Well Adjusted Bird is one of those books that you can hang onto, ready through, and reference from time to time.  The Raising Polly system was developed by a bird owner and breeder with over two decades of experience.  It’s guaranteed to work!

In addition to the Raising Polly e-book, you’ll receive audio files and a bonus book on training your bird, Training Your Parrot…all risk free to you!

Click here to read more about the Bird Tricks training program

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts