Archive for January, 2017

Quick and Easy Bird Training Tips

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

Quick and Easy Bird Training Tips

It’s all about a pattern

Click here to see how easy it really is to have a
happy, healthy and obedient parrot

Have you ever wondered why your bird behaves the way he does? There are a few common reasons that are at the core of all of his behaviors, but the first one is that he learns about his world in patterns. It’s pretty simple, really. He learns that certain behaviors are rewarded in a positive way so he wants to continue doing them, and he learns that other behaviors are punished (have bad consequences) and he tries not to do those again.

In training your parrot you always want to encourage him to repeat behaviors with positive interactions and rewards. Anything your bird views as scary, painful, or otherwise punishing he will come to fear and avoid. You don’t want your bird to avoid you out of fear, so always make sure your interactions are positive and enjoyable for both of you.

Learn more about behavioral basics of parrotst

Instincts can rule the day

One of the other primary reasons he does what he does is out of instinct. Birds come hardwired to have certain instinctual behaviors about them, and instincts are pretty darn hard to unwire. For example, it’s common and normal for your parrot to be fairly vocal and use his voice to communicate with you. You can’t have a silent parrot, but you can work on not doing things that encourage the bad and loud screaming. Training will always be about bringing out your best bird, and that means making it match with what comes naturally to your bird. Luckily, birds are quite curious and intelligent, and you can utilize these traits in training as well.

Click here to read more about training your bird

Training in 15 minutes a day

Training your bird should be a relationship building experience and should really be fun and not thought of as hard work. That means you only need a few minutes a day to focus on some of your training tasks so that you bird still finds training fun.

Parrot Secrets is a professional training system that utilizes the idea of less is more in training meaning that you only need up to 15 minutes a day to really begin training your bird or even to undo bad habits he may already have.

Parrot Secrets contains everything you need to know to keep your bird healthy, happy, and well-trained in a four e-book system. Each book contains tips and tricks on health, training, behavior, neat tricks, and more. For a limited time you’ll also receive two fantastic bonus items. First, you’ll get another e-book all about diseases in birds and how to identify and prevent them to keep your bird as healthy as he can be. Second, you’ll receive all access to a members only website for even more information.

Normally this all costs more, but for a limited time you can receive 5 e-books and the member website access for only $17.95.

Learn more about Parrot Secrets and how it can help you

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts

The Healthy Parrot

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

Dear Parrot Lover,

It is currently estimated that there are over 5 million homes in America that have pet parrots and other birds. Even though these brightly colored and highly intelligent creatures are members of the family, they can still unwittingly pass on germs to their human family. There are a few diseases that parrots can pass onto their people:

1. Cryptococcosis

This fungus is typically found in contaminated pigeon droppings and although it is somewhat rare in pet birds, people can still contract it by inhaling the contaminated dust or if the fungus spores land inside an open wound. Parrots can become infected if there are pigeons in their environment; for example pigeon droppings on a window ledge near a parrot’s cage. People who have been contaminated with Cryptococcus will have symptoms that resemble pneumonia: coughing, fever and shortness of breath.

2. Avian Tuberculosis

Avian Tuberculosis is a disease in which bacteria is spread from birds, parrots and other creatures to people. Parrots that are infected with Avian Tuberculosis will show such symptoms as diarrhea, depression, and lethargy and weight loss. Infected animals and birds will actually shed or molt the bacteria in large amounts throughout their environments.

Although scientist are unsure exactly how Avian Tuberculosis is transmitted to humans, they do know that people get from environmental exposure to the bacteria. Those humans affected usually already have a compromised immune system. Symptoms in people include diarrhea, stomach pain, weight loss and being tired all of the time.

3. Parrot Fever

Parrot owners are more susceptible to Parrot Fever than any other pet owner. It is transmitted when a person breaths in the bacterial secretions of an infected parrot, or other psittacine bird, or from wild birds and poultry. Some parrots will show obvious signs of having Parrot Fever; while other parrots may live out their whole life without showing any symptom at all. People with Parrot Fever will experience headaches, muscle aches, fevers, chills, coughing and breathing issues. These symptoms start between five and fourteen days after the person was first exposed.

The best ways to protect yourself, your family, and your pet parrot, is to practice cleanliness and take your parrot in to see the vet for routine Annual Well Bird Exams. Remember to always wash your hands with warm soapy water after you have handled any bird, or touched their droppings. Keeping your parrot’s cage as clean as possible will also be a great benefit.

The Healthy Parrot

Long live the bird!

Click here to learn how to raise a healthy, happy and thriving parrot

Parrots are a lot more delicate than they may first appear. We all know they can and should live decades. Large parrots can live anywhere from about 50-70 years. The smaller birds can even live over 2 decades. Unfortunately, captive caged birds often don’t enjoy as healthy a life and don’t reach these natural lifespans.

Some of the most common reasons a bird won’t be healthy is actually fairly preventable. Viral and bacterial infections can be prevented with proper housing and cleaning and keeping the bird’s stress levels low. Vitamin deficiency and poor nutrition can be avoided with a full, complete, and nutritious diet.

Click here to learn more about how birds can stay healthy

Learn to be observant

Knowing your bird and his everyday normal behavior is one of the best ways to detect a problem. Birds don’t always appear ill until they are seriously ill, but they often exhibit subtle signs that indicate poor health or disease before then. Make sure you know what is normal for your bird but also spend time with your bird and handle him to know what feels normal too.

Nutritional deficiencies can cause respiratory stress or even seizures over time. Parasites, even internal ones, can cause a bird to pick and itch at himself. Pay attention to a change in his stools and droppings. Also take note of how noisy or verbal he normally is because a drop in communication can indicate a problem too.

Read more about what is normal versus abnormal to be prepared

Raising Polly

How can you know all of these things and be prepared? Raising Polly is a book that contains everything you need to know about how to raise a well-adjusted and healthy bird. You’ll learn the basics of nutrition, cage care, stress reduction, training, and more. You’ll know how to take care of your bird to prevent problems as well as how to recognize when a problem happens.

In addition to the e-book Raising Polly, you’ll receive the audiobook version as well as an e-book about training your parrot. All of this is risk free. You’ll have a 60 day no question asked money back guarantee if you’re not happy.

Click here to learn more about Raising Polly and how it can help you

Regards,
Nathalie Roberts